Christos Tsiolkas
is the author of The Slap, Barracuda and Damascus. He is The Saturday Paper’s film critic.

By this author


Culture June 13, 2020

Missing that big-screen feeling

While welcoming the Covid-19 lockdown as a chance to catch up on some TV and film viewing, this reviewer found himself craving, with a few notable exceptions, the romance of the cinematic experience.

Culture May 09, 2020

Beastie Boys Story

Forgoing depth and complexity for cheap nostalgia, Beastie Boys Story has little of the vitality that characterised the band’s music.

Film March 07, 2020

Undertow

Miranda Nation’s directorial debut, Undertow, begins with power, promise and tension, but it ends up drowning in its own contradictory styles.

Film February 08, 2020

A Hidden Life

Through the story of a farmer who refuses to swear allegiance to Hitler, Terrence Malick’s A Hidden Life reckons with the horrors of the Nazi regime in a quiet, powerful way.

Culture December 21, 2019

Best films of 2019

Streaming services increased their domination of the film industry this year, but the big screen still holds a vital place in cinema.

Culture October 05, 2019

The Souvenir

Joanna Hogg’s autobiographical fourth feature film, The Souvenir, explores the fallibility of memory and attraction, grounded by nuanced performances from Honor Swinton Byrne and Tom Burke.

Culture September 21, 2019

Sophie Hyde’s Animals

Despite some missed opportunities in its storytelling, Animals is sustained by riveting performances from its two leads, and by Sophie Hyde’s generosity as a director.

Film August 24, 2019

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Quentin Tarantino’s childhood love of cinema again is at the fore in his nostalgic paean Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. But when will the writer-director invest his talents in something fresh and challenging?

Culture August 03, 2019

Diego Maradona

After his excellent documentaries Senna and Amy, Asif Kapadia has turned his attention to another modern icon, Diego Maradona. But this new film is inhibited by its narrow vision.

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