Karen Middleton
is The Saturday Paper’s chief political correspondent.

By this author


News November 17, 2018

Morrison ‘hijacked’ NZ tourism review

An audit report covering Scott Morrison’s role in the New Zealand tourism office raises serious concerns over transparency and due process.

News November 10, 2018

Exclusive: Auditor-general found Morrison breaches

While mystery surrounds Scott Morrison’s sacking from Tourism Australia, a buried audit report shows numerous anomalies and concerns over contracts worth $184 million.

Politics November 10, 2018

Kerry O’Brien reflects on John Howard

For a significant part of Kerry O’Brien’s career, John Howard dominated Australian politics. The award-winning journalist talks about the former PM’s divisive recipe for success.

News November 03, 2018

Intelligence agencies’ pitch for powers

Growing suspicion over the government’s security and intelligence powers has seen the heads of two powerful agencies begin a charm offensive to try to win back public trust.

News October 27, 2018

Turnbull used to head off regional distrust

Malcolm Turnbull’s relationship with the Indonesian president is being used to shore up free trade negotiations as Scott Morrison hopes to convey stability abroad.

News October 20, 2018

How Scott Morrison changed his mind on Israel

Three weeks ago, the prime minister said there would be no changes to his policy on Israel. Then, on the eve of the Wentworth byelection, he changed his mind.

News October 06, 2018

Lobbyists dominate mental health sector

As the suicide rate rises, health experts say millions in government funding is going to unproven programs and the sector is captured by lobbyists.

News September 29, 2018

Exclusive: Morrison set reef grant terms

The terms of Malcolm Turnbull’s $444 million Barrier Reef grant were set by Scott Morrison, who as treasurer insisted the money not go to a Commonwealth agency.

News September 22, 2018

New domestic intelligence powers

A new Office of National Intelligence will have increased powers to access personal information and scrutinise online activities. But who will monitor the monitor?