Martin McKenzie-Murray
is The Saturday Paper’s chief correspondent.

By this author


Sport December 22, 2018

The Boxing Day Test

For cricket fans disillusioned and despondent over Australia’s ignominious fall from Test cricket grace, the current series against India promises the best Christmas gift of all.

News December 15, 2018

Fourth AFP officer suicides at work

After a fourth officer’s suicide in just 18 months at Australian Federal Police headquarters, staff hold little hope the organisation will change.

News December 08, 2018

Lawyer X: “Say nice things at my eulogy and enjoy the Royal Commission”

In the wake of this week’s High Court ruling, details emerge of Victoria Police’s unprecedented use of a top criminal lawyer as an informant during Melbourne’s gangland wars.

News December 01, 2018

Inside the Victorian election dirt files

In the wake of the Victorian election, billed as a triumph of positivity over negative campaigning, staffers reveal the lengths political parties went to in releasing dirt on their opponents.

News November 24, 2018

Russian online trolling reaches Australia

Russia and China have sought to influence opinion in Australia using social media, a parliamentary joint committee heard this week, in operations ranging from advocating political positions to ‘fake news’.

News November 17, 2018

After Bourke Street: no easy answer

After three people were stabbed, one fatally, in the centre of Melbourne, terror experts, authorities and politicians are at odds on how to stop ‘lone wolf’ attackers.

News November 10, 2018

Future of kids on Nauru still unknown

The government’s pledge to get children off Nauru only highlights that there remains no permanent solution for asylum seekers detained offshore.

News November 03, 2018

Cricket chairman’s slow reckoning

While cheating players were quickly sanctioned for what Cricket Australia’s Longstaff report damned as a win-at-all-costs mentality, the game’s administrators have been slow to accept responsibility.

News October 27, 2018

The national apology and what comes next

After years of struggle, Chrissie Foster this week watched the prime minister apologise to victims and survivors of institutional child abuse. Now a new fight begins for redress.