Mike Seccombe
is The Saturday Paper’s national correspondent.

By this author


News March 13, 2021

The children of gods: how power works in Australia

The rarefied and entitled boys-only private school network has created massive imbalances and injustice in the halls of power, public policy and broader society.

News March 06, 2021

Experts: Vaccine rollout deadline impossible at current rates

The government’s rollout plans have been stymied by untrained doctors, spoiled doses and communication failures with the states.

News February 27, 2021

Facebook and the news

When Facebook flexed its muscles and temporarily banned Australian news content, negotiations around the media bargaining code took a dramatic turn.

News February 20, 2021

Inequality and the housing bubble

Despite the damaging effects of Covid-19, higher unemployment and flat wages, the Australian housing market has snapped back. But home ownership is becoming increasingly unaffordable for young people, with dire consequences for their future.

News February 13, 2021

Who’s about to get rich off the green energy revolution?

A generation of Australian entrepreneurs is readying for a carbonless future, even as the Morrison government remains stubbornly committed to gas and coal.

News February 06, 2021

Why Scott Morrison finally cautioned Craig Kelly

For as long as it was useful, the prime minister allowed the member for Hughes to spread conspiracy theories online. This week, the political calculus changed.

News January 30, 2021

2050 net zero: Australia left behind as Asia goes green

While the Coalition continues to stall on a net zero emissions target, the biggest buyers of our coal are rapidly shifting to renewables.

News January 23, 2021

The Biden era begins, but the shadow of Trump remains

With his inauguration this week, America’s 46th president has vowed to heal the US. But Joe Biden inherits a country more paranoid and polarised than ever.

News December 19, 2020

Covid-19 saved Morrison, but climate is the real test

Having outperformed the world in containing coronavirus, Australia’s lack of action on climate change will precipitate a much greater crisis.

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