Mike Seccombe
is The Saturday Paper's national correspondent.

By this author


News June 30, 2018

Academic independence threatened by US-style philanthropy

The Ramsay Centre fiasco highlights the dangers of universities ceding academic independence in return for private money, in the manner of billionaire philanthropy in the United States.

News June 23, 2018

How the Liberal Party is eating itself

The Liberal Party’s federal council endorsement of privatising the ABC is a sign of the deep schism between the religious right of the party’s rank and file and its more pragmatic parliamentary leadership.

News June 16, 2018

Howard, Abbott and the Ramsay Centre

The falling out between the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation and the ANU highlights the right’s hypocrisy over the values it purports to defend.

News June 09, 2018

Mitch Fifield, the IPA and the ABC

Consistent attacks against the ABC by Communications Minister Mitch Fifield point to a man on a mission to destroy the independent authority of the national broadcaster.

News June 02, 2018

Privatisation by stealth

With Serco handed the contract for Centrelink’s call centre, and the NDIS saddled with inexperienced labour hire staff, the government is privatising the public service by stealth.

News May 26, 2018

Small business at the banks royal commission

The small business testimonies to the banking royal commission revealed a more nuanced area of questionable practices, but one that still turns up stories of personal hardship.

News May 19, 2018

The final challenge to religious chaplains

After two High Court decisions, the fight against federal funding for religious-only school chaplains is set to end with a test case on state anti-discrimination law.

News May 12, 2018

The truth about wage stagnation

While the government trumpets its jobs figures, it refuses to engage with wage stagnation. The truth is, nobody knows by what formula wages will go up again.

News May 05, 2018

Inside the ‘just add people’ dogma

Successive governments have maintained high levels of immigration to stoke the economy. The argument against this is growing, bringing together odd bedfellows.