Mike Seccombe
is The Saturday Paper’s national correspondent.

By this author


News May 26, 2018

Small business at the banks royal commission

The small business testimonies to the banking royal commission revealed a more nuanced area of questionable practices, but one that still turns up stories of personal hardship.

News May 19, 2018

The final challenge to religious chaplains

After two High Court decisions, the fight against federal funding for religious-only school chaplains is set to end with a test case on state anti-discrimination law.

News May 12, 2018

The truth about wage stagnation

While the government trumpets its jobs figures, it refuses to engage with wage stagnation. The truth is, nobody knows by what formula wages will go up again.

News May 05, 2018

Inside the ‘just add people’ dogma

Successive governments have maintained high levels of immigration to stoke the economy. The argument against this is growing, bringing together odd bedfellows.

News April 28, 2018

Judging politics by Centrelink’s rules

The treatment of politicians who fail to properly report their personal circumstances is markedly different to the draconian system imposed on the poor.

News April 21, 2018

The rise of homelessness and hunger

While the government remains focused on neoliberal solutions to inequality, homelessness and hunger worsen. Some in the sector wonder whether it is deliberate.

News April 14, 2018

Wage theft and migrant workers

Gross underpayment of Australia’s migrant workforce has become institutionalised in a variety of industries, and with the Fair Work Ombudsman under-resourced and unions kept at bay, the government appears unwilling to address the problem.

News April 07, 2018

Turnbull and the boomer racket

Malcolm Turnbull is promising his next budget will be a pitch to the boomer generation, serving only to deepen intergenerational inequality.

News March 31, 2018

Gap not closing on Indigenous disadvantage

The government’s assessment of Indigenous disadvantage ignores how far behind remote communities are compared with cities, and how top-down policy-making reinforces economic disparities.