Mike Seccombe
is The Saturday Paper’s national correspondent.

By this author


News September 23, 2017

Proving political collusion in water buybacks

Following revelations about inappropriate dealings with irrigators, the first of six inquiries finds a regulator captured by vested interests.

News September 16, 2017

Climate action stalling here and in America

The federal government is ignoring the realities of climate change – mirroring trends towards inaction in American politics.

News September 09, 2017

Inside the ‘Yes’ case

The ‘Yes’ campaign is refusing to get sidetracked by bitter personal fights with those opposed to same-sex marriage, focusing instead on inclusion.

News September 02, 2017

The influence of political donations

A senate inquiry will consider how donations to political parties influence policy and how they’re hidden, calling on representatives from the biggest donors in the mining and banking industries to explain what they’re buying.

News August 26, 2017

How the religious right stall climate action

While most religious leaders accept climate change, the Christian right in Australia and the US make scepticism a tenet of their politics.

News August 19, 2017

Nobbling the charities

The government is waging a multifaceted campaign to reduce the influence of charities, requiring disclosure of how donations are spent, seeking to ban electoral campaigning if overseas funds are received, and choosing not to renew the tenure of the respected head of the sector’s regulatory body.

News August 12, 2017

Australia’s human rights disgraces

After leaving her post as president of the Australian Human Rights Commission, Gillian Triggs is as forthright as ever in describing the country’s slide backwards in its social policies and treatment of the vulnerable.

News August 05, 2017

Family trusts and tax dodges

As politics comes to reckon with inequality, Bill Shorten’s former defence of discretionary trusts has morphed into a policy to more harshly tax them.

News July 29, 2017

The Uluru statement and Indigenous recognition

The Uluru statement’s call for a voice to advise parliament surprised some for its pragmatism, sidestepping earlier recognition debates. As a result it will test the major parties’ avowed commitment to give greater power to Indigenous Australians.