culture

culture

portrait February 17, 2018

My grandmother’s death

Reflecting on what’s lost with the passing of a generation.

culture February 17, 2018

Christopher Hitchens: The lost interview

Writer Christopher Hitchens first met Peter Wilmoth in 1989, covering the Romanian revolution. In 2010, two weeks before Hitchens was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer, the pair caught up for lunch in Sydney. Hitchens died 18 months later, and the tape of that conversation was missing until now. “I know I get very oppressed by the way that every day is more and more subtracted out of less and less.”

film February 17, 2018

‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool’

As a fading diva in Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, Annette Bening reminds the reviewer of why he fell in love with film in the first place.

books February 17, 2018

The Melody

Somewhere in Europe, on a dark night, in a decaying seaside villa, a lonely old widower confronts an intruder in his kitchen. Alfred Busi has long been accustomed to the nightly din created by wild dogs, cats, monkeys, deer, pigs and rats that...

books February 17, 2018

The Passengers

Sarah and her granddaughter Hannah are travelling from San Diego to Australia by cruise liner. It’s a homecoming of sorts, as well as the completing of a circle: Sarah was a war bride who left her family back in Sydney in 1946 to sail to the...

culture February 10, 2018

Knowing Helen Maudsley

A firm believer in the importance of understanding the ‘grammar’ of visual arts, Helen Maudsley is celebrating her 90th birthday with a solo exhibition at National Gallery of Victoria. “Art is a language like literature is a language and music is a language, and you have to learn it.”

portrait February 3, 2018

Poet Alan Wearne

Lunch with ‘that’ teacher, poet Alan Wearne.

music February 3, 2018

Hookworms’ ‘Microshift’

Hookworms’ third album Microshift sees the Leeds psych rockers take a krautrock turn to underpin lyrics that explore loss and trauma.

culture February 3, 2018

Theatre director Ivo van Hove

Theatre director Ivo van Hove is often drawn to adapting film screenplays for the stage, but his latest work, juxtaposing three warrior kings from Shakespeare’s histories, shows he also finds contemporary relevance in the classics. “Richard III just wants to be king, but once he’s got the crown, he’s totally bored. He can only reign, only live, only feel in order to have power.”

books February 3, 2018

The Only Story

Julian Barnes is the de facto novelist laureate of the English postwar middle classes. Across his handful of novels and many short-story collections, he has held a mirror to the world of middle managers and provincial bankers, treating their myths...

books February 3, 2018

Peach

“Thick stick sticky sticking wet ragged wool winding round the wounds …” The stuttering, staccato poetry of Emma Glass’s dark and surreal debut novel grabs you by the throat from the very first sentence and throws you straight into the head of the...