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News

What the future holds for Fairfax

“Some 3000 journalism jobs in Australia have gone since 2012. While there have been new entrants to the market, the collective muscle of journalism is wasting.”

Fairfax’s latest staff cuts signal a crisis in Australian journalism, but international models offer a ray of hope.

News

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News

Deradicalising Indonesian terrorists

Amir Abdillah helped kill and maim dozens of people but the now-free convicted terrorist says he’s done waging holy war. With many fellow jihadists being released from jail, the spotlight is on efforts to deradicalise them.

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News

Scott Morrison budgets on turn-in from the world

As the treasurer squares up for a fight with the banks over a new levy, his budget finds its unifying theme in making an example of foreign money.

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News

Homelessness after cyclone Debbie

In the aftermath of cyclone Debbie’s floodwaters, the northern New South Wales town of Murwillumbah is suffering a housing crisis, with homelessness rife.

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News

Did Max Castor disappear deliberately?

The father of a Swedish man missing in Victoria since 2004 believes his son vanished by choice. So is Max Castor still alive?

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World

FBI probe lands its director in firing line

Security agencies get $321 million budget boost; Just the start for Macron; Jakarta governor jailed for two years.

Opinion

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Opinion

Michael West
Multinationals’ brazen tax avoidance

“American Express is the archetypal multinational tax avoider. It conducts ‘related party transactions’ with other Amex entities in a tax haven. Via these transactions, profits are siphoned offshore before tax can be paid. It produces very low profits, or losses, in Australia. This is typical of multinationals – the less they make in profit here, the less they pay in tax. The standard corporate tax rate in Jersey is zero and the rate for financial services companies is 10 per cent. The corporate rate in Australia is 30 per cent.”

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Opinion

Paul Bongiorno
Turnbull’s budget turnaround

“One of Malcolm Turnbull’s inner sanctum was upbeat as journalists pored over the details of this week’s budget. ‘Labor’s got nowhere to go,’ he said. Judging from his demeanour in the Parliament House lock-up, Treasurer Scott Morrison shared this view. Or, more accurately, hopes this view was shared by his colleagues and, most importantly, the voters in coming weeks’ opinion polls. Make no mistake: Morrison’s fate and his prime minister’s hinge on just how well received is their spectacular political pirouette. ”

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Diary

Gadfly
A Mark of respect

There’s too much death about, particularly the death of good people. The arseholes seem to live forever. After a long illness and a brave fight, Mark Colvin has gone. He was a fixture on our landscape presenting ABC Radio’s PM for 20 years with a voice that reassured us the program was dependable.

Letters & Editorial

Cartoon

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Editorial
Running race

You cannot make an ad with the slogan “Australians First” and not be dog-whistling at racist anxiety. Irrespective of who was cast in it and who saw it before it was screened, this was its intention. This racist anxiety was the only reason it was made.

Letters

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Make all schools great

Mike Seccombe’s “The war on universities” (May 6-12) could form part 2 of his “Schools of injustice” article (October 8-14, 2016), as a most comprehensive journalistic dissection …

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The class of 2017

Mike Seccombe’s article identifies a genuine but not well-understood dilemma in Australian politics and everyday life. I am one of those whose political views shifted in line with the research upon which …

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Culture

Profile

Pinchgut Opera’s Erin Helyard’s emotional engagement with Baroque music

Erin Helyard’s fortepiano performances referencing Schubert’s sexuality and syphilis reveal the harpsichord virtuoso and leader of Pinchgut Opera’s strong belief in historical context and personal experience informing musical expression.

Film

Jordan Peele’s ‘Get Out’

Jordan Peele’s satirical horror Get Out fails to frighten by addressing America’s race politics on the surface rather than probing its subconscious fears.

Portrait

My grandmother at 109

“Her heart is old now, and tired. I imagine the physical process of the blood coursing through atria and ventricles, the ageing heart muscle clenching and relaxing, pumping the blood on the long journey through the veins and tributaries of her body. I imagine the beats becoming sluggish, slower, with the constant effort of motion: expand and contract; breathe in and breathe out.”

Food

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Food

Orecchiette with cauliflower and anchovy

“There are various techniques to achieve the perfect, ear-like shape, with its smooth indentation and the cracked surface to hold sauce, but I won’t go into them here. The one I recommend involves the corner store. The shape of the pasta is a perfect foil for sauces, but in this recipe I’ve gone for something a little bit drier.”

Life

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Fashion

Fashion labels Ten Pieces and SZN

The desire for a stripped back ‘uniform’ may speak to a catastrophic future but, it’s more about saving the present by simplifying choices and consuming less.

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Travel

Hiking the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu

The arduous trek in the Andes to visit the ruins of Machu Picchu is made possible only by the assistance of Incan descendants.

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Sport

Baby steps: Renae Ingles, 30, netballer

Adelaide Thunderbirds’ Renae Ingles on the triumphs and struggles of returning to top-level netball as the mother of twins and the wife of an NBA basketballer.

Books

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Eva Hornung
The Last Garden

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Sally Abbott
Closing Down

The Quiz

1. For which film did Julia Roberts win a Best Actress Academy Award? (Bonus points for naming the three other films for which she has been Oscar-nominated.)
2. What is the name of the official plane of the vice-president of the United States?
3. What is the currency of Argentina?
4. Name the NASA spacecraft that is travelling between Saturn and its innermost rings.
5. What does the Latin word lacrima refer to?
6. What is the usual colour of a wild budgerigar’s chest?
7. What museum and memorial is located in Oświęcim, Poland?
8. The Roman numerals MCMLXXVII represent which year?
9. Which teams will play in this month’s FA Cup final?
10. In which month is Mother’s Day celebrated in Britain?

Quotes

POLITICS

“I gave the treasurer the applause that I thought he deserved.”

Tony Abbott The former prime minister explains his tepid reaction to the budget. In fairness, it can be hard to hear clapping of any kind from way out there on the backbench.

BIGOTRY

“I went to the Cheesecake Shop late the previous afternoon, selected a soft cake so that it was least likely to cause any physical injury.”

Tony OverheuThe former farmer reveals he hit Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce in the face with a lemon meringue pie because he is scared of same-sex marriage. Based on available evidence, he is also afraid of smiling and speaking at more than eight words a minute.

WELFARE

“If somebody is drug dependent, they have a problem ... this is a way of helping them.”

Malcolm TurnbullThe prime minister commends drug testing for welfare recipients. Because enforced hardship has always been the best way to deal with addiction.

MEDIA

“I think people realise that you can live without reading Fairfax newspapers. I think it’s a better way to lead your life, that would be my advice.”

Peter DuttonThe minister for immigration celebrates the proposed loss of more than 100 journalists at Fairfax Media. Certainly, it makes his job of perpetuating human rights abuses that little bit easier.

FOOD

“Students can be told it’s okay to fellate your boyfriend three times a week, but because of health requirements you can only have a sausage roll once every semester.”

Peter PhelpsThe New South Wales MLC complains of guidelines to combat childhood obesity. He is on the parliament’s privileges committee, but this does seem outside his remit.

DEATHS

“It’s all been bloody marvellous.”

Mark ColvinThe ABC broadcaster sends his final tweet. Colvin died from an autoimmune disease he contracted while on assignment in Rwanda in 1994. He was 65.