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News

Bolt, Pascoe and the culture wars

The Saturday Paper spent two days at the National Library of Australia reviewing the original documents and explorer accounts in question. They are – at every instance – quoted verbatim.”

As Andrew Bolt attempts to start a culture war over Bruce Pascoe’s Dark Emu, a search of primary documents affirms the book’s accuracy.

News

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News

Westpac: Austrac fallout spreads

While court documents filed by the financial regulator outline serious allegations of security mismanagement at the bank, the sector braces for further scrutiny.

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News

Security agencies investigating Chinese spy claims

Despite the furore over new allegations of Chinese espionage and interference, experts are urging a cautious response, saying there are many questions yet to be answered.

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News

Oil drilling in the Great Australian Bight

“ ‘The bight’s out of the national consciousness,’ says Sean Doherty. Had Equinor applied to drill in the Great Barrier Reef, he says, there’d be more sound and fury.”

Surfers around the world have joined Mirning traditional owners and environmental activists in the fight against oil drilling in the Great Australian Bight.

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News

Hydrogen strategy backs dirty coal

“There is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for Australia to build a zero-emissions energy export and it could be squandered by the fossil fuel industry and its backers locking the country into high-emissions hydrogen.”

Although touted as a clean energy project, the government’s investment in hydrogen production is in fact protecting the fossil fuel industry – a paradox that may limit the value of the new technology.

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World

Pro-democracy landslide in Hong Kong local elections

Hong Kong voters back pro-democracy protesters. Bougainville referendum on independence. Unrest in Iran over steeper fuel prices. Michael Bloomberg enters race to be Democratic presidential candidate.

Opinion

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Opinion

Jana Favero and Kon Karapanagiotidis
The importance of medevac

“Medevac works, medevac is saving lives, limbs and hope. It is a clinical process, led by doctors – robust, orderly – wherein 86 per cent of all successful applications are in fact approved by Peter Dutton himself. Before medevac was enacted, 12 people died in Australia’s care in offshore processing. Since medevac, there have been no deaths.”

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Opinion

Paul Bongiorno
Taylor twist as Morrison phones a ‘friend’

“Scott Morrison’s handling of the police investigation into Energy Minister Angus Taylor this week brazenly flouted conventions of propriety and integrity. The prime minister actually phoned the New South Wales police commissioner, Mick Fuller, and then told parliament based on that call he was not required to stand the minister aside.”

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Diary

Gadfly
Rhodes to perdition

By now the gatekeepers at the entrance to the Rhodes Scholarship must be rewriting the requirements. What a collection of political mugs they have delivered us in recent years: The Mad Monk, Malcolm Trumble and Grassgate Gussy Taylor. All Rhodes, and all terrible at their politics. Old Cecil must be turning in his plot.



Letters, Cartoon & Editorial

Cartoon

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Editorial
In a Taylor spin

The boys in the photo are still wearing their tuxedo jackets as they dive, arms tangled together, through the bonfire, and crash to the ground, unsinged. Others strip to their underwear to make the leap. One, perhaps not so lucky, is doused with a fire extinguisher by his peers. In the background, their boat is engulfed in flames, embers streaking the black night.

Letters

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The challenge of China

I feel sad and worried to see Australia’s stance towards China reduced to a struggle between fear and greed, as described in Vicky Xiuzhong Xu’s article, “Keating exposes China divide” …

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Taking a stand

Paul Keating’s lone voice in dismissing China’s hawkish fears is admirable. This issue reveals much about our politicians and the usual China experts as they continually ignore the basic fact that we …

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Culture

Profile

Publisher and writer Hilary McPhee

Once a powerhouse of Australian publishing, Hilary McPhee traded the comfortable life she knew for a mysterious job with Middle Eastern royalty. In writing about this adventure and the collapse of her marriage to Don Watson in her new memoir, Other People’s Houses, she traces her strange journey back to herself. “I dreaded coming back to Australia because I left feeling I’d lost everything, I’d lost my marriage. We’d been together for more than 20 years, so it was quite a lot of life.”

Music

Albums of 2019

Four recent releases highlight the wealth of talent on the Australian music scene, ranging from rap and R&B to emotional torch songs and shattering destruction.

Theatre

Apocalypse Meow: Crisis Is Born

Both riotously funny and achingly true, Apocalypse Meow: Crisis Is Born confirms Meow Meow as one of the world’s finest cabaret artists.

Poem

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Maxine Beneba Clarke
The panther

                     quick-footed

and poor-visioned,

 

sumatran rhinos

      (unless raising young calf)

prefer

                to live alone

 

in solitary ease,

                   and singing their shadow


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Life

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Food

Non-traditional tiramisu

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Travel

Prison visiting

When it comes to lining up family holidays, the author is committed to planning the perfect escape.

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Sport

Alyssa Healy takes the gloves off

She’s one of Australia’s most celebrated women cricketers in her own right and the niece and wife of two champions of the game. Alyssa Healy talks about the challenges and triumphs of her sporting life.

Books

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Jeff Sparrow
Fascists Among Us

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Emma Larking (ed.)
We Refugees

Puzzles

The Quiz

1. Which country defeated Australia to win the 2019 Fed Cup?
2. Which author links the books Notes from a Small Island, A Walk in the Woods and A Short History of Nearly Everything?
3. Humboldt, gentoo and chinstrap are all types of which bird?
4. Fidelio is which composer’s only opera?
5. What beginning with ‘k’ is the name for the Chinese characters used in the Japanese writing system?
6. Jefferson City is the capital of which US state?
7. What is the English translation of the French word vin?
8. What is the principal monetary unit of Denmark and Norway?
9. The jacaranda is a subtropical tree native to which continent?
10. Who has been named to replace Tony Jones as host of the ABC’s Q&A? (Bonus points for naming the pair who will host Channel Nine’s Today in 2020.)

Quotes

AUTO

“Should have done steel ball on window, *then* sledgehammer the door. Next time…”

Elon MuskThe Tesla founder explains why the “bulletproof” glass of his new Cybertruck smashed when tested during its launch. Luckily the truck’s future carjackers will never go sledgehammer first.

DYNAMISM

“We need to ensure we have a strong and vibrant night-time economy that reflects our position as Australia’s only truly global city.”

Gladys BerejiklianThe New South Wales premier announces the end of Sydney’s lockout laws, except in Kings Cross. Punters would surely consider The Star casino’s revenues as “strong and vibrant”.

TECHNOLOGY

“Can’t find my password.”

Nikki HaleyThe former United States ambassador to the United Nations is revealed to have used unsecure communications after North Korea tested a ballistic missile in 2017 because she was locked out of her classified emails. Surely Nikki1234! isn’t that hard to remember?

REMITTANCE

“Brian leaves the bank with a strong balance sheet, with each of our businesses number one or two in their markets.”

Lindsay MaxstedThe Westpac chair farewells Brian Hartzer. With only $11 billion wiped off the bank’s share price, the former chief executive’s $2.686 million payout seems paltry.

CONGENIALITY

“Of course he has never brought my bins in.”

Mick FullerThe NSW police commissioner walks back what he told Ben Fordham last year about his relationship with Scott Morrison. Taking in your bins, taking your call – it’s all just being neighbourly.

VALE

“Keep in mind that shorter is better, and that a single line is best.”

Clive JamesThe literary giant offers some advice to journalists penning obituaries. He died, aged 80, in Cambridge on November 24.