Kieran Pender
is an Australian writer and lawyer, and a visiting fellow at the Australian National University college of law.

By this author


news December 21, 2019

Examining the second draft of religion bill

Five years after George Brandis declared ‘people have the right to be bigots’, the government wants that proposition enshrined in law.

Sport December 14, 2019

Track cycling world champion Stephanie Morton

Following Anna Meares’ retirement, Stephanie Morton has emerged as Australia’s new track sprinting star. This weekend the reigning world champion races in Brisbane, but her sights are firmly set on Tokyo 2020.

Sport September 21, 2019

Amanda Spratt’s cycling hopes

Australian cyclist Amanda Spratt had her best season yet in 2018 – but fell just short of the world title. Can she go one better this year?

Sport August 31, 2019

Boomers set to take on the world

Fresh from a historic win over the United States, Australia’s basketballers head to the FIBA World Cup in China with their sights set on a medal.

Sport July 27, 2019

Two-time Tour de France stage-winner Caleb Ewan

Once heralded as ‘cycling’s next big thing’, Caleb Ewan was controversially left off his team’s 2018 Tour de France roster. Given a start this year with Lotto Soudal, the Australian sprinter has now rewarded the Belgian outfit with two stage wins.

Sport July 06, 2019

Lydia Williams, the conqueror

An early exit from the FIFA Women’s World Cup left the Matildas bitterly disappointed. But for Indigenous goalkeeper Lydia Williams it just offers another opportunity to overcome adversity.

Sport June 22, 2019

Matildas live their ‘never say die’ motto

After a tumultuous few months marred by speculation and scrutiny, the Matildas’ fightback against Brazil showed a team determined to prove its critics wrong.

Sport May 11, 2019

Australian cycling team’s world stage

How Mitchelton-Scott, Australia’s only World Tour cycling team, is scaling the heights of road racing.

News March 23, 2019

The public service code of conduct

A Canberra public servant’s anonymous posts on social media led to her sacking and now to the High Court in a free speech case with far-reaching consequences for the federal government.