opinion

opinion

diary December 15, 2018

Gadfly: Stricken in the Fox house

What a pleasure it is that HBO’s Succession is being streamed by Fox Drama, even if you do have to creep past the After Dark Monsters from the Sky News lagoon to get there. This is a blistering satire of a media mogul family, so closely reminiscent of the Molochs as to be entirely recognisable. The ancient, desiccated media tsar, Logan Roy, played by Brian Cox, is surrounded by offspring squabbling over the trust and who will take the reins of his junk-laden empire.

letters December 15, 2018

Christian values ignored by politicians

Watching the rage and fierceness of the speech Prime Minister Scott Morrison gave last week, declaring he would use anything to stop the Urgent Medical Treatment Bill from being successful, I kept wondering how can this possibly align with Christian...

politics December 15, 2018

The dead policy scrolls

It is perhaps easy, given the pitiful state of our federal politics, to forget just how much worse is the state of our policies. They are connected, of course, those principles and pathways. We need them to frame and guide the way we are governed...

editorial December 15, 2018

Mighty men of values

We know, now, a little more of what the election will look like. We know that it will be desperate. We know the Morrison government will do anything to win, except develop policies that address the concerns of the electorate. The stories are already being placed. In The Daily Telegraph is spurious legal advice that says Labor’s “softened border policy” would invite criminals into Australia.

diary December 8, 2018

Gadfly: Saltbush silly limits

The long arm of the mining industry is everywhere, sticking its shadowy fingers into as many pork pies as it can find. The Saltbush Club is the latest conspiracy-theory entrant into the climate wars. Among its directors are legacy mining men Hugh Morgan of Western Mining and Jerry Ellis, previously on mahogany row at BHP and a former grand fromage at the Minerals Council of Australia. Old favourite Ian Plimer is also a member of the club, which recently received a rousing endorsement in the Pied Piper outlets of similarly aged media gnome Lord Moloch.

politics December 1, 2018

The duel in the Liberal crown

Worldwide, centre-right political parties find themselves in crisis. The mantra of free and open markets coupled with individual liberty is under threat from extreme right – not conservative – forces infiltrating these once mainstream parties...

politics December 1, 2018

Julia Banks and the Coalition’s loss of a sensible centre

The day the Morrison government sank deeper into minority with the desertion of backbencher Julia Banks, the Opposition leader went for the jugular. Bill Shorten’s first parliamentary question summed up the dreadful situation the government of...

diary November 24, 2018

Gadfly: Nine circles of Herald

Will the newspapers from Nine Entertainment Co (NEC) become more entertaining or are they going to continually drown us in scoops about Chinese infiltrators, corrupt local government councillors and crowded railway platforms? Can we look forward to a bit more of Tracy Grimshaw’s comments on the ozone layer or Eddie McGuire, from Millionaire Hot Seat, on the Productivity Commission’s horizontal fiscal equalisation inquiry? Inevitably there will be a happy blend of entertaining news and views.

letters November 24, 2018

Same old model

The chair of the Australian Republic Movement, Peter FitzSimons, has demonstrated why Australians remain uncertain about a “true” Aussie head of state (Mike Seccombe, “Republic disturbance”, November 17–23). He has used the tired trope of engaging a...

politics November 24, 2018

Populist Morrison reverses policies

Next week federal parliament resumes and the leader of the house, Christopher Pyne, will table the schedule of sittings for 2019, an election year. He is sure to follow the convention of identifying the second Tuesday in May as budget day. But few...

editorial November 24, 2018

Fear factory

Scott Morrison is afraid. He fears losing the prime ministership he fell into. He fears Muslims. He fears the looming threat of Australia being caught out with no baseload power. This week, the familiar spectre of gender stirred fear in our prime minister. Not the “gender whisperers” being deployed into our schools, but the choice by Tasmania to change its laws around gender on birth certificates.